My five most recent reads

Writing the first post for a new website is always difficult. For this reason, I’ve decided to list the five books I’ve most recently read, starting with the most recent. Want to know more about me? Head on over to my about page.

1. If Cats Disappeared From The World by Genki Kawamura

I picked up this book by Japanese novelist, Genki Kawamura for no reason other than liking the cover. An easy read, I finished this in a day, but the narrator, coming to terms with the sudden end of his life, draws the reader into considering what is really important in life in this philosophical and quirky book.

2. The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer

Recommended to me by a friend, this powerful story introduces us to Matt, a young schizophrenic wrestling with guilt over the loss of his brother. I felt numb when I had finished it. Beautifully written, it reaches out and gradually worms into you and squeezes your heart. I don’t have the words to articulate the emotion this book provokes. Highly recommended.

3. First Term at Malory Towers by Enid Blyton

An odd one to throw into the list, but I enjoy revisiting my youth and reading the books I enjoyed when I was younger. I was a huge fan of the St Claire’s and Malory Towers books by Enid Blyton, longing to join in with a midnight feast at boarding schools and revisiting Malory Towers is like a plate of hot buttered toast and a hug.

4. The Accidental Marathon by Lucy Hawking

There is nothing wrong with enjoying fluff and when my friend posted this to me to cheer me up, I looked forward to a light Jane Costello style read. However, that old saying “don’t judge a book by its cover” is true and I was surprised by how many layers this book actually had. Despite an occasional tendency to the far-fetched, the plot line was a gripping look into crime in the art word, and culminated with our heroine running a marathon.

5. Evening Class by Maeve Binchey

Another book that is as comforting as a hug. An Italian language evening class starts in Dublin and brings together characters whose lives intertwine in different ways. With a love triangle on the side, each character’s story stands alone as a story, culminating in a glorious group visit to Rome.

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